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How to Make UTM Codes and Why They’re Important

Urchin Traffic Monitor (UTM) codes do a lot more than just make URLs ridiculously long. They play a pivotal role in measuring your marketing efforts and can help you see what resonates most with your audience.

So, what is it?

A UTM code is part of a custom URL that allows you to track a source, medium and campaign so you know exactly where your website traffic is coming from. It was originally used in conjunction with Urchin, a  web statistics analysis program developed by Urchin Software Company. Google purchased the software in 2005 to grow Urchin’s online product, which we now know as Google Analytics. Continue Reading

Social Media Strategy: Brevity v. Verbosity

With so many great ideas to share with the world, it's easy for us to lose sight of how much effort our followers are willing to put into reading about every. little. detail.

So we compose beautifully written, elaborate Facebook posts about branding, strategy, the meaning of life, knowing that this information is important enough for everyone to appreciate and read. I’m terribly sorry to tell you this, but it’s not. It’s too long. Continue Reading

What does being a good friend have to do with writing good copy?

More than you think. You don't have to paint your readers' nails or watch True Blood together, but you do have to make them feel special.

There are a lot of reasons why I’ve come to love advertising. I think one of the biggest might be that the majority of its principles are intuitive.

Understand how (most) humans think and feel, and you’ll understand how to sell them things.  And I’m not talking about Dr. Melfi levels of psychological proficiency here – just the basics. Remember, common sense will carry you.

Think about your ad like a friendship you’re trying to cultivate. How would you go about it?

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Stop Writing for Your Old Professors

Remember, they were paid to read those papers. It wasn't just your relationships that got complicated from ages 15-22. I bet your writing did, too.

That’s probably because you were rewarded for it. You wrote something like this:

“Temporal and spatial distances collapse into a singular past that impregnates the present.”

(Source: a very retrospectively embarrassing English Lit paper I wrote in college.)

You smiled approvingly at the computer, took another sip of Red Bull and plodded on. But who really wants to read that? Answer: not even your future-self. Continue Reading